JOHN D MACDONALD


Bahai Mar Slips - Yo, Travis! I gotta newsgroup wants to come aboard!

Big Bill's John D. MacDonald Stuff!

(He wrote "The Executioners" that they based 'Cape Fear' on, don't you know!)

It was a dark and stormy night.....

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ARMY DEDICATION REPRINTS TOUR DE FORCE BRASS-KNUCKLED SCIENCE FICTION COLLECTIONS REVENGE NOVELIZATION POLYMATH MAFIA VILLAIN TRAVIS McGEE NOVELS MAINSTREAM NOVELS SCIENCE FICTION NOVELS MAINSTREAM SHORT STORIES SCIENCE FICTION SHORT STORIES ANTHOLOGIES NON FICTION FURTHER READING MOVIES/TV TALKING BOOKS
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john d macdonald

"We run a strange kind of country in the modern world. Customs and Immigration are in a sense token services. Any plausible-looking person can find many ways to come and go unimpeded. Anything that can be flown or floated can be brought in or taken out. We are but a wide place in the road in the middle of the world, and they wander through, back and forth, marveling at the lack of restraints. It is a paradox. The openness which endangers our system is the product of the policy which says that to close our borders and enforce all our rules and back them up with guns would change the system just as completely as any alien force.

Terrorism is going to pay us one fat bloody visit. But it will only be a visit. They underestimate our national resilience. Aroused by that kind of savagery, we will become a very tough kind of people."

John D. MacDonald. Taken from "The Green Ripper" 1979.

john d macdonald

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STOP PRESS - THE BLACK SQUALL!

This is the book they're all talking about on the internet! Is it really about McGee's daughter, Jean? Buy it here (.com only, not .co.uk) and decide for yourself!

Author Lori Stone says about herself; "I grew up in a house filled with books. Theology, history and poetry were mainstays, but my father also kept an enormous collection of pulp fiction. Dashiell Hammet, Mickey Spillane, Alistair MacLean and John D. MacDonald were among his favorites, and they became a passion of mine as well. That led to a love of Florida fiction, so it is only natural that "The Black Squall" is set in the Sunshine State, and that it pays homage to earlier works. Featuring female protagonists, it is the first in a series of Jean Pearson mystery-detective novels." -- Lori Stone

john d macdonald

Read my interview with Lori

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John D(ann) MacDonald was among the last major writers to serve time in the pulp magazine "school of hard knocks", along with Ray Bradbury, Louis L'Amour and Evan Hunter/Ed McBain. He went from penny-a-word pulpster to million-dollar-a-year doyen, creator of Max (Cape Fear) Cady and Travis McGee but not overnight! John D. (affectionate short form) was born in Sharon, Pennsylvania, on 24th July 1916. According to Francis M. Nevins, Jr., MacDonald's father was a "strong-willed alcoholic who rose Horatio Alger-like from humble origins to become a top executive at a firearms company in Utica, New York." (Revised introduction to The Good Old Stuff [Gold Medal edition, November 1963].) The junior MacDonald contracted mastoiditis and scarlet fever at twelve years of age, leaving him bedridden for a year. He turned to books for comfort and intellectual escapism. MacDonald was educated at Utica Free Academy (graduation: 1933), the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School of Finance (1934-35), Syracuse University, New York (1936-38: BS degree in Business Administration), and Harvard Graduate School of Business (1939: MBA). He married Dorothy Mary Prentiss in 1937; their only child, Johnny, was born in 1940.

ARMY

After several dead-end jobs, MacDonald joined the U.S. Army as a lieutenant in June 1940. Three years later came a posting to Staff Headquarters, New Delhi, where he was soon head-hunted by the Office of Strategic Services (which later became the Central Intelligence Agency). He made the rank of lieutenant colonel. While serving overseas, MacDonald sent his wife short stories instead of letters (which were censorable), and Dorothy submitted these to umpteen magazines. 'Interlude in India' sold for $25 to the well-respected Story Magazine, and was published in the issue dated July-August 1946. That sale fired MacDonald's ambition to become a full-time writer. In the four months after his discharge, he churned out 800,000 words of miscellaneous fiction. More than thirty stories were shotgunned into the publishing marketplace, but the unsold manuscripts came back, and back, and . . . Nevertheless, MacDonald's maniacal persistence finally paid off. He wrote and published scores of mystery/sports/Western/science-fiction stories between 1947and 1952. Black Mask, Astounding Science Fiction, Doc Savage, Dime Detective, Startling Stories, WeirdTales just about every pulp magazine then extant carried his work. Pulp magazines were lineal descendants of the old dime novels. They published cheap fiction on even cheaper paper, using a jumbo format (approximately ten inches by seven). Anyone who wants to know more about them should consult Ron Goulart's Cheap Thrills: An Informal History of the Pulp Magazines, originally issued by Arlington House in 1972 and reprinted as an Ace paperback the following year. It's never been published in the UK. MacDonald was so prolific that pseudonyms and house names became a routine necessity. Among those he used were John Lane, Henry Rieser, John Wade Farrell, Robert Henry, Peter Reed and Scott O'Hara.

DEDICATION

MacDonald's The Good Old Stuff (1982) includes a generous dedication: "To the memory of a lot of good men who wrote well for the pulp magazines but had less luck than I." No, no, a thousand times no! MacDonald made his own good luck - with talent, market research, tenacity, self discipline and the vital knack of learning from his most catastrophic mistakes. The thirteen mystery stories ('mystery' here being a catch-all term, taking in traditional whodunits, noir-ish psychodramas, thick-ear thrillers and the basically hard-to-place) in TGOS show MacDonald at his early near-all-time best. The original pulp magazines are, of course, highly collectible - if you can find them. Prices range from a few pounds to second-mortgage lunacy, depending upon condition, the other writers to be found in the same issue, cover artwork, and dear old market forces. Pulp writers in the early 1950s were like buggy-whip makers at the turn of the century. The once-flourishing pulps were dying on the vine. By 1955, those magazines that hadn't converted to the more economical 'digest' size (approximately five-and-a-half by seven-and-a-half inches) had gone where the good doggies go. The cannier wordslingers found an alternative market in the 'slick' magazines, which paid better but needed far less material than the ever-hungry pulps. MacDonald himself had begin selling to major slicks like Cosmopolitan, Esquire and Liberty. But the higher ground of book publication still eluded him. Meanwhile, the slicks were also being mortally wounded by television and - unkindest cut of all - the upstart paperback companies (background reading: Undercover: An Illustrated History of American Mass Market Paperbacks by Thomas L. Bonn [Penguin Books, U.S., 1982]). Like many another writer of that era, MacDonald found himself ready, willing and able to take up the new challenge. ("Luck is the moment when preparation meets opportunity" - Anthony Jay.)

REPRINTS

But - and it was a big BUT - the leading paperback companies (Pocket Books, Bantam, Avon) mainly published reprints by established hardcover 'names' like Agatha Christie, James Hilton, Luke Short and Pearl S. Buck. Minor outfits (best forgotten) were often fly-by-nighters that paid their authors on law-suit - if ever. Then along came Gold Medal Books, founded in 1949 by magazine publishers Roscoe and William Fawcett. They quickly cornered the market in original paperback novels. Several new authors were discovered/developed by editors William C. Lengel and Richard Carroll, including Edward S. Aarons, Stephen Marlowe, Richard S. Prather and Gardner F. Fox. (Paperback Parade No. 33, March 1993, is largely devoted to this pioneering imprint.) 'John D. MacDonald' soon became a familiar byline on the yellow-spined 'Gold Medals', appearing on 36 original volumes published over three decades. First off the presses, in 1950, was The Brass Cupcake (GM No. 124). The oddly lifeless front cover was painted by Baryé (Barry Philips - now one of the most collectable paperback artists). The Brass Cupcake easily measures up to anything by Hammett, Chandler, and the other MacDonald (Ross). Cliff Bartells is a claims adjuster with the Florence City firm of Security Theft and Accidental Insurance Company, Inc. He used to be a police lieutenant until he offended the local Mob and his gold badge was taken away from him. "Once, as a kid on the bum, I was stuck in a county can," Bartells reminisces early on in the book. "They had their own language in that jail. Anything you got by guile. . . was called a cupcake. . . So when they took it away from me, it wasn't even a badge anymore. Just another cupcake. . . A brass cupcake. Something of no importance . . . Yet I cried into my pillow like a fool kid that night." (p. 6) Ex-cop (and ex-soldier) Bartells is the prototypical angst-ridden MacDonald hero. He only just resists temptation, barely keeping faith with his secular Puritan nature. Melody Chance is an equally prototypical John D. heroine: "I would have thought her completely subdued were it not for the pixie glint in her eyes, the glint that promised future defiance, future battle when the making up would be the best part of it." (p. 205) The Brass Cupcake also reveals: (a) MacDonald's knack of creating - and animating - non-existent places (here, Florence and Ybor Cities) in an otherwise authentic Florida/Texas/wherever; (b) his obsession with explaining how things work, from insurance companies to crooked real-estate deals (or is that a tautology?).

TOUR DE FORCE

Over the next few years, Gold Medal published a slew of MacDonald novels: Murder for the Bride, Judge Me Not, Weep for Me (all 1951); The Damned (1952); Dead Low Tide, The Neon Jungle (both 1953); and All These Condemned (1954). Quickly written, yes - but well-written. The Damned, for example, was MacDonald's first sustained effort at 'mainstream' fiction, a slices-of-lives tour de force set in non-touristy Mexico. The front-cover blurb includes a claim from Mickey Spillane that he'd have liked to have written it himself. As well he might. The once-despised Gold Medals ("What Gold Medal has proved is that we didn't know how lousy novels could be" - Bernard de Voto) are now enjoying belated critical praise - especially those written by MacDonald, Jim Thompson and Charles Williams. Frederick Muller published several of MacDonald's novels in the UK. under their 'Gold Medal' imprint. Fawcett's new-boy rivals (Pyramid, Ace, Ballantine) were not slow in jumping upon the 'paperback original' bandwagon. But MacDonald stayed faithful to Gold Medal - until Dell Books and Popular Library made him offers he couldn't refuse.

BRASS-KNUCKLED

Dell published nine John D. novels: Area of Suspicion (1954); A Bullet for Cinderella (1955); April Evil, Murder in the Wind (both 1956); Death Trap, The Price of Murder, A Man of Affairs (all 1957); Soft Touch, The Deceivers (both 1958), plus the anthology, The Lethal Sex (1959). Soft Touch was the first MacDonald novel to be filmed. Retitled Man-Trap, the movie starred Jeffrey Hunter, Stella Stevens and David Janssen, and was released in 1961. It is described in The New York Times Guide to Movies on TV as "a second-rate melodrama, derived from a typical, brass-knuckled John D. MacDonald crime yarn that read better and certainly moved faster" - enough said. Pan Books published Soft Touch under the title Man-Trap in 1961 (Great Pan No. G533).The Pan reprints are attractive volumes, especially those with "handcuff covers" like The Neon Jungle (1965) and The Price of Murder (1966). Popular Library issued four MacDonald books: Cry Hard, Cry Fast (1955); You Live Once, Border Town Girl (both 1956); and The Empty Trap (1957). "This book, like all Popular Library titles, has been carefully selected by the Popular Library Editorial Board for its literary substance and entertainment value" - it says here. Gold Medal eventually bought the rights to the Dell, Popular Library, Pocket Books and Signet (see below) titles, so becoming MacDonald's sole American paperback publisher. Hardback issues usually appeared under the 'Crest Books' imprint, which Fawcett had founded in 1955 to handle reprints.

SCIENCE FICTION

By 1950, MacDonald had become an established science fiction writer, with thirty odd - some very odd - stories to his credit. 'Spectator Sport' (Thrilling Wonder Stories, February 1950), which anticipated 'Virtual Reality', is a fine example. Kingsley Amis called it a "delightfully nasty story" in his 1961 study, New Maps of Hell: "A man who has been given a pre-frontal lobotomy by mistake is compensated by receiving for nothing what everybody else is saving up all his money for: total and irrevocable immersion in three-dimensional participatory television, the favourite series opted for being Western, Crime and Detection, and Harem." (p97; Four Square edition, 1963) Wine of the Dreamers (Startling Stories, May 1950) was MacDonald's first science-fiction novel. The eponymous dreamers, inhabitants of a dying planet, use hypnotic control to prevent Earthmen from reaching the stars. Greenberg, New York, published an enlarged version of Wine in 1951 - making it the author's first hardback title. Pocket Books changed 'Wine' into 'Planet' two years later, British publishers, Robert Hale (at the start of a long and mutually profitable association) following suit in 1954. 'Planet' reverted back to 'Wine' for the 1968 gold Medal reissue. Ballroom of the Skies (Greenberg, U.S., 1952) was less successful than Wine/Planet, both artistically and in terms of filthy lucre. An abridged version of this aliens-among-us novel appeared in Two Complete Science Adventure Books for Winter 1953, and Heyne later published a German translation (Herrscher der Galaxis, 1967). Gold Medal added it to the 'Collected Works' in 1968. (The blurb for their edition reads: "Drake Lorin . . . became aware of the aliens living among us - and discovered their sinister purpose.") MacDonald wrote few science fiction stories after he'd established himself in the (much) more lucrative crime-suspense genre. Then he made a labour-of-love comeback with The Girl, the Gold Watch and Everything (Gold Medal, 1962). The Girl can best be described as a ribald fantasy along the lines of the works of Thorne (Topper) Smith. High jinx ensue when the seemingly wimpish hero, Kirby Winter, inherits a gold watch from his eccentric uncle Omar. The watch can make him invisible by retarding time. There's also Bonnie Lee Beaumont, with whom - according to the cover blurb - one day is "like a three-year lease on a harem". A TV-movie version of The Girl, the Gold Watch and Everything appeared in 1980, starring Robert Hays, Pam Dawber and Maurice Evans. It was well-made, at every level. However, the 1981 sequel, The Girl, the Gold Watch and Dynamite, might well have been a below-par episode of Lost in Space. Sixteen of MacDonald's futuristic tales were collected in Other Times, Other Worlds (Gold Medal, 1978). Apart from 'Spectator Sport', this now-scarce volume contains classic stories like 'A Child is Crying' (Thrilling Wonder Stories, December 1948) and 'The Annex' (Playboy, May 1968) as well as an afterword by the author and a complete bibliography of his science fiction titles.

COLLECTIONS

As for MacDonald's shorter works, he has himself put together four collections of stories: End of the Tiger and Other Stories (Gold Medal, 1966), S*E*V*E*N (Gold Medal, 1971), The Good Old Stuff (Harper, U.S. 1982) and More Good Old Stuff (Knopf, U.S., 1984). The uncrowned 'king of the paperbacks' returned to the Gold Medal fold in the late Fifties with Clemmie, The Deceivers (both 1958) and The Beach Girls (1959). Appleton Century Crofts had brought out Cancel All our Vows and Contrary Pleasure in hardback (1953 and 1954 respectively), but MacDonald's first real 'breakthrough' novel was The Executioners, published by Simon and Schuster in 1958. The Observer described it as a "well-written, usefully realistic American suspense thriller with a dash of straight documentary". While serving with the Judge Advocate's Department during the Second World War, First Lieutenant Samuel B. Bowden visited Melbourne, Australia. There he caught a brutal rapist, Sergeant Max Cady, and testified against him at the subsequent court-martial. Cady was found guilty and sentenced to hard labour for life.

REVENGE

Fourteen years later, Sam Bowden has become a laid-back lawyer living near the Florida township of New Essex. Happy family: Sam; his wife Carol; three children (Nancy, Jamie, Bucky); dog (Marilyn). Then Max Cady comes raging out of the past, seeking revenge. "What is to be done when your family is stunned with fear, when the police are powerless to act, when money cannot buy safety?" asked the blurb on the back of the 1961 Pan Edition. "Do you become the law? And even - as a last resort - executioners?" Max Cady ("He's about five nine, wide and thickset . . . more than half bald and deeply tanned, and he looks as though you couldn't hurt him with an axe." ibid., p.10) is one of the earliest psychopathic villains in modern fiction. He narrowly precedes Norman Bates (Psycho, 1959) and - by a much wider margin - Hannibal ' The Cannibal' Lecter (Red Dragon, 1981). Robert Mitchum played Cady in the superb 1962 film version, which was (rather inaccurately) retitled Cape Fear. Despite (because of?) his lack of resemblance to MacDonald's Cady, he stole it away from hero, Gregory Peck, with a performance reminiscent of his evil charmer in The Night of the Hunter (1955). The best that can be said about the 1991 remake (starring Robert de Niro, Nick Nolte and Jessica Lange) is . . . nothing. Crest printed a film tie-in edition of the novel under the title, Cape Fear, as did Pan in the UK. The recent filmasco was commemorated by still-available volumes from Gold Medal (U.S.) and Penguin (UK.). Simon and Schuster further enhanced MacDonald's prestige by publishing more of his books in hardback (original paperbacks rarely got critical attention in those days, at least of a favourable sort). These were: The Crossroads, Please Write for Details (both 1959), The End of the Night (1960) and A Flash of Green (1962). A Flash of Green became an under-rated film in 1984, starring Ed Harris, Blair Brown and Richard Jordan. ("Succeeds in capturing the sleepy tempo of a small Florida town and the corruption seething beneath it" - Schueur's Movies on TV and Videocassette.) At the same time, MacDonald's work for Gold Medal grew in quantity and quality. He wrote five books for them between 1960 and 1963: The Only Girl in the Game, Slam the Big Door (both 1960), One Monday We Killed them All, Where is Janice Gantry? (both 1961), A Key to the Suite (1962), The Drowner and I Could Go On Singing (both 1963).

NOVELIZATION

I Could Go On Singing sticks out like a sore thumb from this list. Based on the screenplay of Judy Garland's semi-autobiographical last film, it was John D's only 'novelization'. He later disowned this written-by-numbers bookette and Robert Hale's 1964 edition stands as the only reprint to date (note; this piece was written in 1994. B.B.). Gold Medal hit a bad patch in the early 1960s when Richard S. Prather, whose 'Shell Scott' novels notched up sales of thirty million copies, defected to Pocket Books. Knox Burger, then Fawcett Editor-in-chief, limited the damage by: (a) building up Donald Hamilton's 'Matt Helm' novels; and (b) persuading John D. to create a series character. MacDonald had written no copycat sagas (Cape Fear Two, whatever) to avoid typecasting and out of plain boredom at the idea. By this time, however, he'd developed a viable hero based upon several early models, personal experiences/reflection and down-home (for him) Floridian local colour. The result - Travis McGee - headed up four novels in 1964: The Deep Blue Good-By (Goodbye in the UK.), Nightmare in Pink, A Purple Place for Dying and The Quick Red Fox (all the 'Travis McGee' books were given colour-coded titles, for easy identification). 1965 was a leaner year, producing only two novels in the series: A Deadly Shade of Gold and Bright Orange for the Shroud. MacDonald went on to write a total of 21 'Travis McGee' books, plus three omnibus volumes.

POLYMATH

Travis McGee might be the last great heroic archetype created in the twentieth century. The rangy rogue lives in-or-near Fort Lauderdale, Florida, aboard his comfortable (if not luxurious) houseboat, the 'Busted Flush' (so-named because he won it in a poker game). McGee is a 'salvage expert'; he recovers money on a contingency-fee basis for clients (usually attractive young women) who have been rooked by confidence tricksters. McGee's next-boat-neighbour, Meyer, is a retired economist who functions as MacDonald's literary alter-ego. Meyer's cabin cruiser has been dubbed the 'John Maynard Keynes'. This black-bearded polymath first took centre stage in Darker Than Amber (Gold Medal, 1966), where he swaps philosophical badinage with McGee - in between fight-scenes. Travis is also an unlicensed sexual therapist, restoring the self-confidence of his female 'wards'. Random examples: Cathy Kerr (The Deep Blue Goodbye); Gloria Doyle Geis (One Fearful Yellow Eye; Gold Medal 1966); and Jillian Brent-Archer (A Tan and Sandy Silence; Gold Medal, 1972). Darker Than Amber was faithfully filmed in 1970, starring Rod Taylor ( a stalwart McGee), Suzie Kendall (Vangie Bellemer), and Theodore Bikel (Meyer). Schueur describes it as "tough mystery action with more brawn than brain". Note that Amber is the seventh McGee novel - not the first, as Pan's tie-in edition would have you believe. The Empty Copper Sea (Lippincourt, U.S., 1978) got the TV pilot-movie treatment in 1983, starring Sam Elliott ( a walrus-moustached McGee!) and Gene Evans (Meyer). "Any chances for a series were deep-sixed with the land developer," commented Maltin's Movie and Video Guide. Three 'McGee'-related items are worth looking out for: John D. MacDonald and the Colorful World of Travis McGee by Frank D. Campbell Jr. (Borgo Press, U.S., 1977), containing plot-outlines of the first sixteen novels; Jon L. Breen's Hair of the Sleuthhound (Scarecrow Press, U.S., 1982), which includes an effective parody of the series, 'Green Gravy for the Blush'; and The Official Travis McGee Quiz Book (Gold Medal, 1984), compiled by John Brogan. MacDonald himself wrote the posthumously-published Reading for Survival (Library of Congress, 1987), which features a long dialogue between McGee and Meyer. (Fans will no doubt wish to learn that there is now a newsgroup dedicated to the doings of Mr. McGee et al, namely alt.fan.travis-mcgee. BB). In 1967, MacDonald came up with his first really long novel, The Last One Left (Doubleday, U.S.), which weighed in at 150,000+ words. It's yo-ho-ho and a bottle of bourbon stuff, featuring murder on the high seas and more coils than the Jungle Book snake. But the real biggies were still to come . . .

MAFIA

Condominium (Lippincourt, U.S., 1977) is that snowball-in-hell - a literate 'blockbuster'. The basic storyline recalls that of an earlier MacDonald novel, Murder in the Wind (1956; published by Robert Hale the following year under the titleHurricane), but only in the way that Arthur C. Clarke's 2001: A Space Odyssey resembles his 1951 short story, 'The Sentinel'. The Observer summed it up as follows: "(Because) of a business Mafia that has saddled them with soaring leases, the residents of a plush, jerry-built apartment block on the polluted Florida coast can despair of their hopes of a happy and secure retirement; the concrete is cracking, Hurricane Ella is brewing up . . ." adding that the book "combines the qualities of Harold Robbins and John O'Hara".The drab 1979 TV-movie version of Condominium featured stars (?) like Steve Forrest, Dane Clark and Stuart Whitman, as well as "special effects that even the makers of low-budget Japanese horror flicks would have rejected on the grounds of tackiness" (Schueur again). One More Sunday (Knopf, U.S., 1984) is arguably MacDonald's best novel, and unarguably his most controversial one. Its 'hero', John Tinker Meadows, does for organised religion what Ghengis Khan did for world peace. His 'Eternal Church of the Believer' uses high-tech computer equipment to solicit/process the big bucks that flow in daily from 'unsaved souls', and there's more going on behind the pews than you can shake a prayer book at. "MacDonald has written what Graham Greene would call an entertainment," commented Newsday. "Readers looking for hypocrisy in the big business of charismatic religion will find it in abundance."

VILLAIN

John D's last novel, Barrier Island (Knopf, U.S., 1986), is a let-down after Condominium and - especially - One More Sunday. The phrase "mixture as before" springs to mind - there's dirty doings in the 'Redneck Riviera' (which runs from the Florida panhandle to the Texas border), an amoral villain (Tucker Loomis), and an off-white hero (Wade Rowley). Nevertheless, the book nicely augmented MacDonald's 70,000,000+ sales figures. MacDonald died on 28th December 1986 at St. Mary's Hospital in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, following a heart bypass operation. John D. had little time - or inclination - for interviews and self-promotional squibs. However, The House Guests (U.S., Doubleday, 1965; UK., Robert Hale, 1966), a series of mémoires about his many devoted family pets (including Knees the hitch-hiking goose) contains a lot of interesting autobiographical information. There was also a fan magazine, The JDM Bibliophile. But his works of fiction will always stand as MacDonald's best memorial. The 'Travis McGee' books have never been out of print in the U.S. thanks to Gold Medal, and other welcome reprints include The Good Old Stuff, The Brass Cupcake and The Damned. The pulps may have gone, but John D. MacDonald lives on!

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TRAVIS McGEE BOOKS

NOVELS; MAINSTREAM
NOVELS: SCIENCE FICTION
SHORT STORIES; MAINSTREAM
SHORT STORIES; SCIENCE FICTION
ANTHOLOGIES
NON-FICTION

MOVIES/TV

Buy Travis McGee Books Through These Links!

A brief word on how this works. If you click on any of the links below, you'll be taken to the page at Amazon where you can buy the book. Because you've linked to there from my site, I get commission on the sale. It's not a lot in, fact so far it's nothing at all, but in theory it helps to keep this and my other sites afloat (sigh).

USA

The Deep Blue Good-By
Nightmare in Pink
A Purple Place for Dying
The Quick Red Fox
A Deadly Shade of Gold
Bright Orange for the Shroud
Darker Than Amber
One Fearful Yellow Eye
Pale Gray for Guilt
The Girl in the Plain Brown Wrapper
Dress Her in Indigo
The Long Lavender Look
A Tan and Sandy Silence
The Scarlet Ruse
The Turquoise Lament
The Dreadful Lemon Sky
The Empty Copper Sea
The Green Ripper
Free Fall in Crimson
Cinnamon Skin
The Lonely Silver Rain

TALKING BOOKS

The Deep Blue Good-By
Nightmare in Pink
A Purple Place for Dying
The Quick Red Fox
A Deadly Shade of Gold
Bright Orange for the Shroud

Darker Than Amber

One Fearful Yellow Eye
Pale Gray for Guilt
The Girl in the Plain Brown Wrapper
Dress Her in Indigo
The Long Lavender Look
A Tan and Sandy Silence
The Scarlet Ruse
The Turquoise Lament
The Dreadful Lemon Sky

The Empty Copper Sea

The Green Ripper

Free Fall in Crimson

Cinnamon Skin
The Lonely Silver Rain
Barrier Island
Condominium
John D. MacDonald Value Collection : The Deep Blue Good-By/One Fearful Yellow Eye/the Lonely Silver Rain (The John D. MacDonald Collection) [ABRIDGED]
One More Sunday

FURTHER TITLES

A Bullet for Cinderella
A Key to the Suite
A Man of Affairs
All These condemned
April Evil
Area of Suspicion
Ballroom of the Skies
Barrier Island
Border Town Girl
Cancel All Our Vows
Cape Fear (Formerly The Executioners)
Clemmie
Condominium
Contrary Pleasure
Cry Hard, Cry Fast
Damned
Dead Low Tide
Death Trap
End of the Tiger and Other Stories
Judge Me Not
More Good Old Stuff
Murder for the Bride
Murder in the Wind
Neon Jungle
No Deadly Drug
Nothing Can Go Wrong (with John H. Kilpack)
On the Run
One Monday We Killed Them All
One More Sunday
Other Times, Other Worlds
Piel Canela
Please Write for Details
Price of Murder
Reading for Survival
Seven (not the m*o*v*i*e*!)
Slam the Big Door
Soft Touch
The Beach Girls
The Crossroads
The Deceivers
The End of the Night
The Girl, the Gold Watch and Everything
The Good Old Stuff
The House Guests
The Last One Left
The Only Girl in the Game
Two
Where is Janice Gantry?
Wine of the Dreamers
You Live Once

FURTHER READING

UK

A Deadly Shade of Gold
A Flash of Green
A Tan and Sandy Silence
Bright Orange for the Shroud
Condominium
Dead Low Tide
Dress Her in Indigo
Film Classic:"Cape Fear"
Free Fall in Crimson
Green Ripper
Judge Me Not
Lonely Silver Rain
Long Lavender Look
McGee 4
Nightmare in Pink
One Fearful Yellow Eye
Pale Gray for Guilt
Purple Place for Dying
Quick Red Fox
Seven
The Crossroads
The Deep Blue GoodBye
The Dreadful Lemon Sky
The Empty Copper Sea
The Girl in the Plain Brown Wrapper
The Scarlet Ruse
Turquoise Lament
You Live Once

RELATED

Meditations on America : John D. MacDonald's Travis McGee Series and Other Fiction
The Red Hot Typewriter : The Life and Times of John D. MacDonald

TALKING BOOKS

A word about these talkies. There are none actually in the UK, they are all imports from the States. Still cheaper than ordering them from there, though, as you don't have to pay shipping from the States.

The Green Ripper
John D. MacDonald Value Collection : The Deep Blue Good-By/One Fearful Yellow Eye/the Lonely Silver Rain (The John D. MacDonald Collection)
Cinnamon Skin
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And lastly, I used to have piccies of the plaque at Slip F-18 here, but they got corrupted over time. I'll get more. The plaque itself is no longer at the slip, in fact the whole dock's been remodelled. The plaque's in the dockmaster's office, and I'm told they'll bring it out for a photograph if you ask nicely.

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The above article and list were adapted from that authored by one Graham Andrews from the March 1994 issue of Book and Magazine Collector (U.K.).

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